FAQ - SHEA Power Passport and Course Details

EUSR SHEA POWER PASSPORT – FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q. How long does the EUSR SHEA Power Passport Card last for?
A. For three years.

Q. What is the cost of a EUSR SHEA Power Passport?
A. The cost of the registration is £36 (correct as of December 2022). The ‘Vicarda’ app (CSCS system) is issued for your smart phone. An optional plastic SmartCard with a chip can be purchased. The cost of the course varies according to the location and numbers.

Q. How long does the course take?
A. One working day.

Q. Does the card give you CSCS recognition?
A. Yes, many employers have said that they prefer this route for obtaining CSCS cards as its easier than directly through CSCS.

Q. Where are the training courses held?
A. Delivered by videoconference on ZOOM  or alternatively at your premises in England and Wales. Whatever suits your needs best.

Q. I have more questions, who should I contact?
A. Please send questions by email to peterbradley@achievesafety.co.uk or phone him on 07901 726419

EUSR SHEA POWER SAFETY PASSPORT COURSE CONTENT

UTILITY SAFETY HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS (POWER)

INTRODUCTION.

This one-day course has been developed by the electricity transmission and distribution sector with the aim of providing a uniform approach to health, safety and environmental awareness training across the utility sector. The training will be delivered by Peter Bradley, a former Health, Safety and Environmental Manager for United Utilities – at the time one of the largest combined electricity distribution and water companies in the UK. He holds a Master of Technical Science degree in Process Safety and Loss Prevention from Sheffield University, a Chartered Safety and Health Practitioner and also a qualified teacher with a Diploma In Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector (CertEd) from the University of Chester . He has extensive experience of training delivering courses for Costain, Jacobs, Siemens and many other construction and utility companies

SHEA Power Course Modules – UPDATED December 2022

Power generation and distribution

Understanding our workplace responsibilities
Understanding the effects of our work on the environment
Identifying and controlling risks
Common hazards in the workplace
Occupational Health Hazards

Power industry hazards

Responding to Emergencies

MODULES OF THE SHEA POWER PASSPORT AND THE KNOWLEDGE AREAS COVERED

1 – POWER GENERATION AND DISTRIBUTION

Developing an awareness of how power is generated and distributed across the network through substations, overhead lines and underground cables. An introduction to network components and the different voltages.

2 – UNDERSTANDING  OUR WORKPLACE RESPONSIBILITIES

Explaining the underpinning legal frameworks, definitions and their application in the workplace setting, including the responsibilities for both the individual (as an employee) and the employer. Why is it important to manage health, safety and the environment.
Duties under the Health & Safety at Work etc. Act (1974) not to harm themselves or other persons.
Describe the role and powers of HSE inspectors.
State the principles followed in the Construction, Design & Management Regulations (2015) (CDM).
Consequences associated with poor environmental management.
Enforcement and Regulators such as the Health and Safety Executive, Environment Agency (EA) and Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA).

3 – UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF OUR WORK ON THE ENVIRONMENT

Key environmental considerations in the workplace, and their impact as employees, on the sustainability of their environment.

The Waste Hierarchy.

The Environmental Protection Act 1990

Major Water Industry Environmental Prosecutions brought by the Environment Agency.

Thames Water – £20m fine for sewage pollution in River Thames
United Utilities and contractors – fined almost £1m for polluting river with sodium hypochlorite

Southern Water – £90m fine for sewage discharges

4 – IDENTIFYING AND CONTROLLING RISKS

Helps the individual to identify and control risks and hazards, and understand their role in preventing them through a range of positive and proactive health and safety behaviours.

State hazards associated with access and egress to place of work e.g. falls from height, slips, trips etc.
State the reasons for good housekeeping.
Describe the welfare provision required.
Define the terms: ‘hazard’, ‘near miss’ and ‘accident’.
HSE Guidance on risk assessment.
Explain the required reporting processes for near miss, accidents, work related illnesses and dangerous occurrences.
Explain why all accidents should be reported, however minor.
State general emergency procedures e.g. fire evacuation and first aid.
Explain the need to assist in any investigations.
Recognised extinguisher types by colour and their correct use.

5 – COMMON HAZARDS IN THE WORKPLACE

Develops the ability to both identify a range of common physical hazards and minimise their impact in the workplace, in line with CSCS requirements.

Responsibilities of employers and employees under the Provision & Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER).
Complying with the Lifting Operations & Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER).
State the basic principles applied within working at height regulations.
Describe how ladders are used safely.

6 – OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH HAZARDS

Explains the meaning of the term ‘occupational health’ and develop the individual’s understanding of a range of occupational health hazards and their requirements. It helps individuals identify, mitigate for and minimise occupational health hazards in the workplace. health hazards. – Asbestos, manual handling, noise.
Chemical health hazards – Control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH)
Biological health hazards – Weil’s disease.
Psychosocial health hazards – mental health at work.

7 – POWER INDUSTRY HAZARDS.

Aims to provide safety awareness of electricity systems and develop an individual’s understanding of electrical safety rules, the purpose of authorisations and the hazards associated with electricity including shocks, burns, arcing and impressed voltage.

8 – RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES.

Responding to emergencies. Develops individuals’ understanding of emergency response behaviours, the role of reporting, inspection and enforcement of health & safety in the workplace. It also develops an individual’s understanding of the impact on employee and employer of both poor/improving health and safety in the workplace. Reporting of injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences regulations 2013 (RIDDOR) Dealing with spillages if trained and competent. Fire precautions.

Updated 28 February 2023